NME to close print edition after 66 years

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NME to close print edition after 66 years

Postby Tony » Fri Mar 09, 2018 4:06 am

https://www.theguardian.com/media/2018/ ... c-magazine

I suppose the death of the paper version was inevitable, I suspect sales have been low for years. I can't say I've found much to enjoy from even the website version (which will remain) on a regular basis, although it was great to see La's information appear there thanks to our relevant members.

Any thoughts? It's got a bit of an odd place for me. I grew up in the 90s which was arguably past its heyday anyway and my favourite bands are the La's (some great historical articles, some a bit less pleasant like the 1995 There He's Gone article), and the Smiths - Morrissey now I find tedious, but I can't shake the idea the NME and their stupid planted stories broke up the Smiths. I don't take that too personally but it does seem to have had a chequered history at times in terms of leadership and focus.

It's tricky to say with only hindsight, but I get the feeling it peaked in the 70s and only achieved sporadic similar heights since.

Not much else has resonated for me though I have since enjoyed the books of several of its writers. Nick Kent being in my view the absolute best of them.

It's a sign o the times. It has a part of history in the long tale of the La's, and probably a positive one, in terms of overall coverage. But alas, it could be a symptom of music today, or the world going digital.

So we wave goodbye to the magazine that certainly gave us hours of fun reading past articles on our favourite band.
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Re: NME to close print edition after 66 years

Postby Khris » Sat Mar 10, 2018 1:09 pm

I remember, every week, I'd go and buy the NME and the Melody Maker. They were decent publications back then. Of course, in the internet age it's tough to compete. But it must be said that they both went downhill because of a number of things. Cheif amongst them was piss poor editorship. The NME became full of pop/rap/hiphop crap and, somewhat understandably, adverts.

I always used to like the record reviews and I remember the amount of new releases they reviewed and the types of releases became less and less attactive. Maybe in trying to survive they tried to become all things to all men. Instead, they became nothing to no one and the death knell has sounded.
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Re: NME to close print edition after 66 years

Postby Gav » Fri Mar 16, 2018 11:49 am

Khris wrote:I remember, every week, I'd go and buy the NME and the Melody Maker. They were decent publications back then. Of course, in the internet age it's tough to compete. But it must be said that they both went downhill because of a number of things. Cheif amongst them was piss poor editorship. The NME became full of pop/rap/hiphop crap and, somewhat understandably, adverts.

I always used to like the record reviews and I remember the amount of new releases they reviewed and the types of releases became less and less attactive. Maybe in trying to survive they tried to become all things to all men. Instead, they became nothing to no one and the death knell has sounded.

Respectfully, think the opposite is true.

They betrayed their mission statement to cover new music relevant to youth culture by clinging to irrelevant guitar groups and ignoring other music genres which were resonating with youth culture, such as Hop/Hop Etc.

The irony of "New Music Edition" putting long since ceased guitar bands (who were never too popular to begin with) on the front-page of the magazine in place of artists who actually were popular (and with artistic merit) doomed the publication.
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Re: NME to close print edition after 66 years

Postby Khris » Fri Mar 16, 2018 4:49 pm

The problem with that opinion is that the NME paid little attention to motown/soul in the 60's/70's, hip hop in the 80's and beyond. That focus on guitar music did not hurt it then. I read the NME through the 80s' to the middle 2000's and I noticed much more coverage of hip hop, rap, garage, grime and dub step in the last 10 years, despite what you say about it ignoring new music trends. It was very much a guitar basied, indie based readership and it failed to appreciate that.

The irony is that the NME's readership was always interested in new music and the NME could have maintained its readership by keeping those readers happy (well into their 30's and 40's). There wasn't a need to pander to youth culture because the market wasn't there for the NME.
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Re: NME to close print edition after 66 years

Postby da capo » Sat Mar 17, 2018 10:57 pm

Watched that NME documentary that they had on the beeb a few years ago and thought about how cool it used to be to go to the Pike Place market and read the foreign press in the 90's. Sad to see another thing that I used to like go the way of the dodo.
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Re: NME to close print edition after 66 years

Postby Syl » Thu Mar 22, 2018 8:34 pm

I bought all three every Friday, from the late 80s onwards, remember Sounds? They went to the wall first, then Melody Maker.. I'm surprised Time kept the physical copy going for so long.
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Re: NME to close print edition after 66 years

Postby Dan » Sun Mar 25, 2018 12:58 am

I believe that twat Conor McnIcholas did irreversible damage to the NME brand. I don't think many readers from "back in the day" have mourned the passing of the paper because it turned into an irrelevant joke years ago. What I don't miss are the bitter take downs written by failed musicians in what they claimed were reviews.
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Re: NME to close print edition after 66 years

Postby Syl » Sun Mar 25, 2018 8:47 pm

da capo wrote:Watched that NME documentary that they had on the beeb a few years ago and thought about how cool it used to be to go to the Pike Place market and read the foreign press in the 90's. Sad to see another thing that I used to like go the way of the dodo.


Cheers da capo. For anyone curious: Inky Fingers - The NME Story (BBC2/BBC4) (2005)

Quite enjoyable, wasn't expecting much, given how awful the publication itself, was, around the same time.

Available on YouTube, I'm not going to embed, as the parts will just suffer a quick death. Go to YouTube and search for the title..

Floating around readily as a torrent, too.

Nice to see Nick Kent still among the living..
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