Lee in Johnny Marr's book

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Lee in Johnny Marr's book

Postby Tony » Fri Nov 11, 2016 4:00 pm

Image

http://www.johnny-marr.com/johnny-marr-autobiography

Hardback: http://hyperurl.co/STBF_Amazon
Ebook: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Set-Boy-Free-Johnny-Marr-ebook/dp/B01ELHTQT8
Audio Book: http://hyperurl.co/STBF_Audio

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So Johnny Marr's autobiography has been out for a week. I have been going through it looking for more info on Johnny's couple of jam sessions with Lee. Found this...

Kids love music, and Nile loved Kraftwerk and also Bob Dylan, and he would amuse himself in the
studio, playing with the gadgets and listening to everything while I was working. My son’s first ever
favourite song was ‘There She Goes’ by The La’s. It was a big hit when he was an infant and it was on the
radio all the time. Lee Mavers, who wrote and sang it, came over to my house for us to feel out the
possibility of doing something together. We got along, and after a while we picked up two acoustic guitars
and started playing some songs, ‘I Can See for Miles’ by The Who, and some Stones and Bo Diddley. We
were really getting into it when my son came toddling in to hear what was going on. Lee said hello to him
and asked him what his name was. Nile answered, and then I asked him, ‘What’s your favourite song,
Nile?’
‘“There She Goes”,’ Nile said matter-of-factly, not having any idea who the man was or why I was
asking, and with that Lee stood up and delivered the whole song like he was singing to 20,000 people.
Nile stood motionless in astonishment, his mouth wide open as Lee Mavers sang to him. It was a lovely
thing, and also quite full-on. Lee and I played together a couple of times, but we didn’t take it any further.
He had his thing to do and I had mine.

The guitar scene in England post-rave was still very vague and had yet to find its raison d’être. The
revolution in electronic music in the previous few years meant that regular rock bands seemed strangely
redundant, and although some bands were trying to assimilate the new technology while still keeping the
values of rock, I wasn’t much interested in that.
The time was right for a new paradigm in guitar music, but at that point I didn’t know where it was
going to come from. The La’s were the guitar band that everybody I knew was talking about, and when I
first heard them I sensed that they might signal some kind of sea change.


Nice little story. Only other mention of Lee seems to be recommending Edgar Jones:

We got together to write some songs. It was just the two of us having a good time with a guitar and
drums for a while, and then I remembered that Lee Mavers had told me about a bass player from
Liverpool called Edgar ‘Summertyme’ Jones.


Few other mentions, such as hearing an Oasis tape and being reminded of the La's.
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Re: Lee in Johnny Marr's book

Postby Marbled » Fri Nov 11, 2016 5:23 pm

It's a good book, and quite amazing to see how productive Johnny has been with so many people.

He doesn't hang around though and is keen to get rehearsal spaces and recordings set up, and having jammed with Lee and Lee only wanting to do the first album (and no new tracks), it's easy (from this book) to see why he moved onto another project.

The quote about Oasis really screamed at me that he thought The La's were the best of the bunch on the scene from the late 80s to the mid 90s.

The last photo in the book, of Johnny stood onstage in Manchester and looking up at the photography in the balcony was taken by my mate Marc. It was pretty incredible to pick the book up on the Thursday and see his photo and credit there.
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Re: Lee in Johnny Marr's book

Postby Tony » Sun Nov 13, 2016 10:48 am

Marbled wrote:
The last photo in the book, of Johnny stood onstage in Manchester and looking up at the photography in the balcony was taken by my mate Marc. It was pretty incredible to pick the book up on the Thursday and see his photo and credit there.


That's really great for your mate, very flattering!

I'm only about a third into the book proper, but I'm already picking up what an individual Johnny is. It's not hard to see the side that even Morrissey was Marr's find, his to unleash. The Smiths being Johnny's band.

I've flipped through various parts, his work ethic is something else. He seems to be able to create then move on - something I think Lee lacks, or it might just be they're at such different points (Johnny wants to create and play, Mavers wants to realise music as it should be and that's in some ways more of a producer angle).

Johnny has a tape of him and Lee jamming. I doubt we will ever hear it. I dunno if it would be the holy grail it sounded like a few years ago anyway, as it's covers, but it would still be fascinating.
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Re: Lee in Johnny Marr's book

Postby Marbled » Sun Nov 13, 2016 4:31 pm

Agreed Tony, about Marr and Morrissey. I'd finished Morrissey's autobiography the week before I started Marr's, and whilst they're very different writers and story-tellers, their views on the same topics/happenings were interesting. I'd agree with the judge I think and take Marr's side over Morrissey's.

It would be great to see Lee get involved with something like Seven Worlds Collide, with Neil Finn, like Marr did. I expect, like Ryan Adams for example, that he wouldn't enjoy the backing musician lark, even for a song (see Power's songs in The La's).

Any idea what songs they would've jammed on, Tony? The covers I mean.
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Re: Lee in Johnny Marr's book

Postby Tony » Sun Nov 13, 2016 8:15 pm

Johnny in Q Magazine in 2013:

Lee and I got together for a few days in the '90s. I've got some tapes somewhere of he and I sat playing whatever came into our heads. Things like I Can See For Miles, Pinball Wizard... most of The Who catalogue, now I think of it [laughs]. What can I say? He is as good as everyone thinks he is. It became apparent at that time that he still wanted to re-record his first album. Everyone was telling him it was perfection and he had to fight against that. When he sang it to me two feet away, in sequence, looking me straight in the eyes, and said, "You're wrong, this is what it should be," I started to sympathise with him. He had a couple of new songs at that time. One was called Coco Daddy and the other one was called On The Rebound. There's so much mythology about a new Lee Maver's song, so out of courtesy to him I've never really talked about it.
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Re: Lee in Johnny Marr's book

Postby Marbled » Mon Nov 14, 2016 12:19 pm

Tony wrote:Johnny in Q Magazine in 2013:

There's so much mythology about a new Lee Maver's song, so out of courtesy to him I've never really talked about it.


I think a lot of people feel that way, as I've had similar responses from John, Jay and Gary.
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